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Fleming,  Mitchel

Fleming, Mitchel

Male 1761 - 1837  (75 years)

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  • Name Fleming, Mitchel 
    Born 22 Apr 1761  Kent County,,Delaware,USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 18 Apr 1837  ,Cape Girardeau County,Missouri,USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Fleming Cemetery,Cape Girardeau County,Missouri,USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements
      Pension application of Mitchel Fleming S16810 fn14NC
      Transcribed by Will Graves 12/28/08

      [Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

      State of Missouri County of Cape Girardeau
      A declaration in order to obtain the benefits of the act of Congress of 7th June 1832. On the 22nd day of December in the year of our Lord 1832 personally appeared before the Justices of the County Court of the County of Cape Girardeau aforesaid, in Open Court, Mitchel Fleming, a resident of Apple Creek Township in the County of Cape Girardeau and State of Missouri aforesaid aged 71 years and eight months Who first being duly sworn according to law; Doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832; That he volunteered in the year 1777 in the County of Rowan in the State of North Carolina, in Order to supply a draft to be made for the term of five months; that he was first mustered into the Company of Captain Craig at the cross roads near Charlotte North Carolina; the Colonel who commanded the Regiment into which he was mustered was Colonel Frank Lock [sic, Francis Locke]; and the General who commanded the brigade, with the troops in that Section, was General Rutherford; that from the cross roads above mentioned, he marched with the troops to the ten mile spring (so-called) ten miles North of Charleston South Carolina, that he laid there with the troops, two or three weeks, and from thence marched with the troops to a place called Purrysburg 20 miles above Savannah, on Savannah River, near the line between South Carolina and Georgia; at the place last mentioned he with the troops above mentioned joined the regular Army under the command of General Lincoln. That he continued under the command of the officers above mentioned reconnoitering up and down the Savannah River; the American Army generally on the East side of said River and the British Army on the West; that he was in a small engagement on the Savannah River, while defending a landing or preventing the British troops, from crossing the River at a place called the Cany Island [? Long Island?], that he remained with the troops at the place above mentioned until the five months expired and was then properly discharged.
      And further, he states that in the year 1782 he was drafted or classed in the County of Rowan in the State of North Carolina aforesaid and was mustered into a company of horse under the command of Captain James Stevenson, that, he marched with the company above mentioned, in a Regiment of horse and foot under the command of Colonel Isaacs, to meet the British at Wilmington North Carolina, but before reaching Wilmington was ordered to stop on Deep River about 50 miles above Fayetteville, having been informed that the British had evacuated Wilmington, that the horse company to which he was attached was employed in reconnoitering the Country about Deep River, suppressing the Tories, disaffected &c; that he served with the troops above mentioned two months during which time they took about 20 Tories were disaffected persons and conveyed them to Salisbury Rowan County North Carolina where he received a written discharge: That not then or since believing that the discharges he received as aforesaid, would be of any service to him, they have been both lost from his possession, and cannot now be found.
      That the said Mitchel removed from North Carolina to Cape Girardeau County Missouri, in the year 1819 where he has resided ever since; that he has no documentary testimony and this Country by which he can establish the facts above related. The said Mitchel hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present; and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State. And to the Interrogatories prescribed by the War department & put by the Court, the said Mitchel Fleming answers and says as follows 1st I was born in Kent County in the State of Delaware in the year 1761 2nd I have my age recorded in my family Bible at my house about 12 miles from this place (Jackson) I hated entered by James Nixon a school master taken from the family record of my father; 4. [sic] I belonged to the militia, and there was a draft to be made and I volunteered on the first call and on the Second of militia were classed and the class to which I belonged were called out; the first being for five months and the second for two months, both of which terms I served 5. I was acquainted with General Lincoln Commander of the regular troops at Purrysburg on the first company and with Colonel Isaacs commandant of the militia from Wilkes County and Colonel Paceley [sic, Paisley] of Guilford County; also commandant of the militia during the last Campaign, and with Captain James Stevenson of the militia; We having not reached the regular Army until the British Army had evacuated Wilmington as aforesaid; the first tour I served in the company of Captain Craig, the second Captain Stevenson; I knew, while on my first tour, Colonel Locke and Lieutenant Colonel Brevard of the militia and their Regiment the only one I knew or served in on the first campaign 6th After serving the first tour of five months I was discharged by Captain Craig, before mentioned, after serving, the second tour of two months under Captain Stevenson, I was discharged by Captain Stevenson at Salisbury, both of which discharges have been lost, I did not consider they would be of any service and after a long time they were mislaid or destroyed 7th I am known by Colonel Samuel B. McKnight and Andrew Martin Esquire two of the Justices of the County court; with General Johnson Ranney, with Honorable Alexander Buckner Senator in Congress; Franklin Cannon Esquire Senator from this County, Peter R. Garrett Clerk of the County Court, and with the Reverend Thomas P. Green all of whom reside near me, who can testify as to my character for veracity and their belief of my services as a soldier of the revolution among whom I have lived for 12 years, and I believe all can testify to my character for veracity. Sworn and subscribed in Open Court this 22nd day of December A.D. 1832. S/ Benjamin Bacon, D. Clerk S/ Michael Fleming [Oliver Harris, Senior gave the standard supporting affidavit.] A.D. 1832 Benjamin Bacon D. Clerk of the County Court For Peter R. Garrett, Clerk


      Robert Brevard Senior of legal age being first duly sworn according to law States that he has been acquainted with Mitchel Fleming more or less for some time before the commencement of the revolutionary war, that they were boys together, and the same neighborhood, at that time Rowan County State of North Carolina; that they both belong to one company in that County; That it was a custom at that time of the war breaking out with Great Britain for the soldiers of the company, when a call was made, to Volunteer, that he has knowledge of said Mitchel Fleming having been out on a tour of duty, but not belonging to the same class in which Mitchel did was never out, at the same time with him: those that some part of the company were sent on an expedition down on the Savannah River; has no doubt but said Mitchel Fleming rendered the services in his declaration set forth and mentioned
      Sworn to and subscribed in open court December 22, 1832
      S/ Robert Brevard
      [Thomas P. Green, a clergyman, and Samuel B. McKnight gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

      [facts in file: veteran died April 15, 1837]
    • Find A Grave Memorial# 66156553
    • -- From the Jackson Post & Cash - Book, June 26, 1974, Jackson, Missouri

      Mitchell Fleming honored; soldier in Revolutionary War…



      By: TOM NEUMEYER

      Mrs. Gale Seabaugh’s great, great, great, great, grandfather, Mitchell Flaming, came briefly into the limelight last Friday as his final resting place was marked by the Daughters of the American Revolution with a bronze plaque honoring him as a soldier in the Revolutionary War. Because few of its veterans came this far west, such a plaque is relatively unique in this area.
      The grave is near New Wells on the old Fleming farm, which is now owned by Marvin Richter. Mrs. Seabaugh, who is Secretary at the Presbyterian Church 1n Jackson, provided the information on her ancestor for this article, with a assistance from her grandfather, H. R. Stevenson of Fruitland.
      Mitchell Fleming was born in April, 1761, in Kent County, Del. In a few years, the Fleming family pulled up stakes and moved south to Rowan County, N.C. near the Coddle Creek Church. He grew up fast in the wilderness that was short on comforts and long on hardships. In 1777 he enlisted in Captain Craig’s Company, of Col. Francis Locke's Regiment at the age of 16. The Company was involved in one skirmish at Coney Island on the Savannah River. In 1782 Fleming became a private in Captain James Stevenson's Company of Col. Isaac's North Carolina Regiment. The pay receipts from the period of his service are listed in North Carolina records.
      With the war’s finale, he married Miss Agnes Kennedy June 27, 1784, in Rowan County N.C. The new family established a farm in Meckinburg (now Cabarrus) County with land he inherited from his father, George Fleming. In 1819 the family joined a group of colonists and left North Carolina by wagon train to arrive in Cape Girardeau County.
      After arriving, Fleming bought some land in Shawnee and Apple Creek Townships at $1.25 an acre. Land patients were issued for his purchases in 1821 and 1823. The land was scoured mostly in 80 acre plots for a total of 840 acres. Practically all of it was located among various creek bottoms. As each of his daughters married, he deeded his new son in law an eighty acre tract, which later was willed to the daughter.
      On September 21, 1821, Fleming's wife died. Agnes was born in Chester Co., Pennsylvania July 20, 1760, and bore all of Fleming's children. In 1824 he took a second wife, Miss Jane Stevenson, who was a sister to his son in law, James Stevenson. Jane and James were children of Fleming's commander, Capt. James Stevenson. James married Fleming's eldest daughter, Jane.
      Besides some confusion in names this caused some confusion in relationships. Jane Stevenson Fleming’s brother, James became her son in law after her marriage.
      Mitchell Fleming began receiving a pension for his tour of duty in the war in 1832 when Congress passed a general pension act. His application was executed December 22, 1832 in Cape Girardeau County.
      The Mitchell Fleming family was charter members of Apple Creek Presbyterian Church. He had the position of first ruling elder till a year before his death. Fleming must have been a deeply religious man, for when finds were being raised to pay for the new church, be pledged his entire pension from the war until the building was paid for. Mitchell Fleming passed away April 18, 1837, at the age of 76, after leading quite a full life. His wife, Jane, followed him in death four days later. The Fleming family plot contains the graves of Mitchell Fleming, his two wives, his daughter Margaret, and a son, Hiram, and his two wives and a daughter. The plot was situated on a hill in the Fleming farm that now belongs to Marvin Richter. Fleming's tombstone is decorated with thirteen stars around the base of the ball on the top.
      Fleming's nine children, all by his first wife, Agnes, were as follows:
      • Jane. She was born January 11, 1786, married James Stevenson in N. C., and died April 16, 1865, and was buried in Apple Creek Cemetery.
      • William married Ginny Woodside in N. C. in 1808 and remained in that state.
      • Richard married Jean Waddington in N. C. in 1814 and also remained there.
      • Margaret was born February 17, 1791, died August 15, 1822, having not married, and was buried in the family cemetery.
      • Mary was born August 26, 1794, married Benjamin Brown in 1824, died March 20, 1864, and was buried in the Apple Creek Cemetery.
      • Agnes was born December 23, 1795, married Robert S. McFarland December 20, 1821, went to Bond County, Ill. in 1837, died May 12,1865 and was buried in Bethel Cemetery, Bond County.
      • Elizabeth married James B. Little in 1824 and it is thought they moved to Texas.
      • Sarah was born January 18, 1802, married Zenas N. Ross, died September 27, 1879, and was buried in the Apple Creek Cemetery.
      • Hiram was born August 17, 1804, was a merchant who had one of the first stores is Jackson, married to Jane Stevenson, January 1837, who died that December, and then married Margaret Stevenson by whom he had one daughter, Martha Jane, born in 1842 and died 1846. The whole family is buried in the Fleming Cemetery.




    • Mitchel Fleming
      Died at his residence in Cape Girardeau Co., Mo. The 16th of April, 1837, Mr. Mitchel Fleming, aged 76 years and 7 days. Mr. F. became hopefully pious at an early period of his life and sustained the high and responsible office of ruling elder in the Presbyterian church for the last 20 or 22 years; the duties of which of which he discharged in such a manner as gave evidence that he felt in some good degree, the solemnity of the work which had been committed to his care. He had been in feeble health for some years, and often expressed a desire to depart and be with his precious Savior; but still professed a willingness to wait his appointed time, until the Bridegroom of souls, should call him to the marriage supper of the Lamb.
      He felt a deep and lively interest in the prosperity of Christ’s kingdom in the world, and especially in that portion of the vineyard over which he had been placed as a ruling elder. A few hours before his sprit took its flight from the body, he said, “ I am not surprised that I am dying; but I am surprised that death does not execute his summons more speedily.” He closed his own eyes, and sweetly fell asleep in the arms of Jesus, without a struggle or a groan.
      It may well be said of our departed friend, that he went down to the grave, like a shock of corn fully ripe.

      Jane Fleming
      Died in Cape Girardeau Co. Mo. May 2, 1837, Mrs. Jane Fleming, widow of Mr. M. Fleming, whose death we have just recorded, in the 61st year of her age. She was a member of Apple Creek church, of which her husband had been ruling elder, and gave comfortable evidence that she had experienced a change of heart, and manifested by her orderly walk and godly conversation that her affections were placed on things above, and not on things on the earth. She died in the exercise of her rational faculties, rejoicing in the hope of meeting her blessed Redeemer in heaven.
      We trust she is now celebrating the praises of God and the Lamb before the “great white throne," with her affectionate husband, whose loss she had mourned only a few weeks !

      Elizabeth Stevenson
      Departed this life in Cape Girardeau Co. Mo. the 8th of May, 1837, Mrs. Elizabeth Stevenson, consort of Mr. John Stevenson, in the 51st year of her age. Mrs. S. died in the same house in which Mr. And Mrs. Fleming had so recently died. Mrs. S. was a member of Brazeau Church, Perry Co., and in the judgment of charity hopefully pious. She left a
      husband, a numerous family of children, and a large circle of friends to mourn her death. She cheerfully submitted to the will of her heavenly Father, and died in peace, with the comfortable hope that her sins were pardoned; her soul sanctified, and that the night of death would be to her the beginning of an eternal day of peace, joy, and immortal glory.

      John Stevenson
      Departed this life in Cape Girardeau Co., Mo., 14th of May, 1837, Mr. John Stevenson, husband of Elizabeth Stevenson, in the 49th year of his age. He was taken sick the night his wife lay a corpse, and was removed next day to his brother’s Mr. James Stevenson, where he died, after an illness of only 6 or 7 days. Mr S. was also a member of Brazeau church, Perry Co. and was regarded by all who knew him as a man in which whose heart the seeds of God’s grace had been planted and watered by the renewing, sanctifying, and genial influences of the Holy Sprit.
      Whilst the tears of the bereaved children still flowed freely for a tender and affectionate mother, new fountains were opened by the sudden death of the beloved and pious father.
      This is indeed an afflictive dispensation of Providence to this bereaved family; but they mourn not as those who have no hope. Mr. S a few hours before he died, put on his spectacles, called for his hymnbook, selected a hymn and requested his mourning friends to sing it. The writer was present when his spirit bade adieu to its clay tenement, and well may it be said of his “Mark the perfect man, and behold the upright; for the end of that man is peace.” Ps. Xxxvii.37. Mrs. Fleming and Mr. Stevenson were bother and sister. This singular and mysterious providence loudly admonishes all the friends of the deceased, as well as all other, of the mortality of man, and the necessity of being prepared for a deathbed and a dying hour. May the Lord, who sits as a sovereign on his throne, bless, comfort and sustain the bereaved.

      Alton Observer | Alton, Illinois | Thursday, June 15, 1837 | Page 3
    • Alena McCord - Mitchell Fleming History


      MITCHELL FLEMING


      by Alenia McCord

      He was born in April 1761 in Kent County Delaware, but very early in life moved to Rowan County, N.C. near the Coddle Creek church, with his parents. There he enlisted in Captain Craig's Company in 1777, age 16 years (Colonel Francis Lock's North Carolina Regiment) and was in an engagement at Caney Island on the Savannah River. He enlisted in 1782 and served as a private in Capt. James Stevenson's Company, Colonel Isaac's North Carolina Regiment. Later his eldest daughter married Capt. Stevenson's son James. (Pay receipts are listed in North Carolina records).
      He married Agnes Kennedy 27 Jan 1784, in Rowan County, N.C. They lived from that time until 1819 in Mecklenberg County (became Cabarrus about 1786) on the land he inherited from his father, George Fleming. In 1819 he went by wagon train with a large colony from the area of the Coddle Creek Church to Cape County, MO. There he purchased a section of land in Shawnee and Apple Creek townships for which he paid $1.25 an acre. He received patents for all this in 1821 and 1823. Agness Kennedy Fleming died in 1821, and in 1824 he married Jane Stevenson, who was a maiden sister of his son-in-law, James Stevenson. The marriage is recorded both in Perry County, MO and in Cabarrus County, N.C.
      One thing about his land purchases: he came to Cape County very early, so he did not take his sections in one piece. He took it in eighty acre parts, and practically the entire 640 acres was in various creek bottoms, the best land at that time. As each daughter married he deeded his son-in-law and eighty acre tract, which was later willed to the daughter.
      In 1832, when Congress passed a general pension law he received a pension for his Revolutionary War service on his application executed 22 Dec 1832 in Cape Girardeau County, MO.

      Mitchell Fleming was a charter member, along with his entire family, of the Apple Creek Presbyterian Church and was the first ruling elder of the church, remaining in that position until the year before his death. He seemed to always been the heaviest contributor to the church. One time, when they were raising money to pay for their new building, he pledged his entire pension from the Revolution until the building was paid for.
      Mitchell Fleming, two wives, daughter Margaret, son Hiram, his two wives and daughter are buried on a hill on his farm, now belonging to Marvin Richter, in Shawneetown Township, Cape Girardeau County, MO. On his tombstone, around the ball at the top are thirteen stars.

      Mitchell Fleming - born 22 April 1761, died 18 April 1837.

      Agnes Kennedy (1st wife, mother of children) - born 20 July 1760 in Chester County, PA, died 21 Sept 1821.

      Jane Stevenson (2nd wife) - born 1776, died 2 May 1837,

      Children:
      1. Jane - born 11 Jan 1786. Married James Stevenson in NC.
      died 16 April 1865, buried in Apple Creek Cemetery.
      2. William - married Ginny Woodside in NC 1808, remained in NC.
      3. Richard - Married Jean Wadington, 1814 in NC, remained in NC.
      4. Margaret - Born 17 Feb 1791, died 15 August 1822, unmarried.
      5. Mary - Born 26 Aug 1794. Married Benjamin Brown in 1824. Died 20 March 1864, Buried Apple Creek Cemetery.
      6. Agnes - Born 23 Dec 1795. Married Robert S. McFarland
      20 Dec 1821. Died 12 May 1865. Came to Bond County IL in 1837. Buried Bethel Cemetery.
      7. Elizabeth - Born ? Married James B. Little, 1824. It is thought they moved to Texas.
      8. Sarah - Born 18 Jan 1802, died 27 Sept 1879. Married Zenas N. Ross.
      9. Hiram - Born 17 Aug 1804, died 22 Mar 1843. He was a merchant, had one of the first stores in Jackson. Married Jane Stevenson, born 1814, died 23 Dec 1837 (dau of John Stevenson) 10 Jan 1837. Married second Margaret ______ did not find a marriage record. All buried in the Fleming Cemetery.

      -by Miss Alenia McCord
      1716 West Jackson St.
      Vandalia, IL 62471
      24 Feb 1974
    • Fleming Family by Miss Eugenia Lore (Cannon Memorial Library, Concord, NC - Researched 29 June, 1992 by Rob Lewis

      If Allison, the 2nd named son, was born in 1759, then Mitchell, then their son was born about 1761, for he is listed as giving military service from Salisbury District during the Revolutionary War and must have been at least 16 years old by 1777 or 1778.

      GEORGE FLEMING, in his will, gave his son, MITCHELL FLEMING, a plantation in Mecklenburg County adjoining Alexander McEwin, James Tanner, John Houston, and John Neisler.

      In the Register's Office in Cabarrus County, Book 9, page 336, MITCHELL FLEMING gave this tract of land to his son, WILLIAM FLEMING "for love and affection."

      MITCHELL FLEMING son of George Fleming and his wife, Margaret, married 27 January 1784 in Rowan County, N.C.

      Agness Kennedy

      Their known children:

      1- William Fleming, 10 Jan 1785, died 10 Oct 1858
      Married Jane Woodsides (of whom further)

      2- Jane Fleming Died 16 April 1865 in Missouri

      Married 26 November 1808, James Stevenson, died 13 Oct 1851

      3- Mitchell Fleming, Jr.

      Married 14 January 1824, Jane Stevenson

      And perhaps these - George Fleming and Hiram Fleming, who we find in Missouri, along with Mitchell and Jane Fleming Stevenson, Jane Fleming and her husband, James Stevenson, and Mitchell Fleming, Jr., migrated to Missouri and were charter members of the Apple Creek Presbyterian Church which was organized 21 May 1821. According to Poplar Tent records, James Stevenson was elected to Eldership in 1820 but shortly afterwards moved to Missouri and being elected to the same office in the Apple Creek Church, served throughout a long and useful life.

      Mitchell Fleming,Jr. evidently came back home, maybe because of the girl he left behind - anyway we find him marrying Jane Stevenson in 1824 here in Cabarrus and he took his bride back to Missouri.

      Perhaps this migration to the west was the reason we find on Book 9, page 336 the deed dated 1819 - no month or day - given by Mitchell Fleming, to his son WILLIAM FLEMING "for love and affection", on waters of Coddle Creek and Park's Creek - Michael Freases' corner, Joseph Baker's line and said William Fleming's line, John Hall's line, Adam and Samuel Rosses' line - containing 145 acres - including all houses, orchards, minerals, etc.
      Wits: James Query and John Kimmons.
      This deed was recorded at the January sessions, 1820.

      This branch of the FLEMING family have been active in the work of the Bethpage Presbyterian Church since its beginning in 1794. Mitchell Fleming was an Elder and Trustee that year. His son, William, was elected and Elder in 1821 and served for 37 years. Thomas A. Fleming was also an Elder and wrote a history of the Church for its Centennial in 1894.

      The Revolutionary War Military Service for Mitchell Fleming is found in Roster of North Carolina Soldiers, pages 379 and 380. He served as a private from Salisbury District and was paid by certificates #2555 and #3076.

      Researched and compiled by Eugenia W.Lore 1971.
    Person ID I71123758  robsgenealogy
    Last Modified 6 Sep 2016 

    Father Fleming, George Jr.,   b. Abt 1730,   d. Apr 1784, ,Rowan County,North Carolina,USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 54 years) 
    Mother Margaret,   b. Abt 1720, Unknown,,, Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1790, ,Cabarrus County,North Carolina,USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 70 years) 
    Married Abt 1755  ,,Delaware,USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F17879254  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Kennedy, Agnes,   b. 20 Jul 1760, ,Chester County,Pennsylvania,USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Sep 1821, ,Cape Girardeau County,Missouri,USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 61 years) 
    Married 27 Jan 1784  ,Rowan County,North Carolina,USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Fleming, Mitchel to Agness Kennedy NC Marriage Index 1741-2004
    Fleming, Mitchel to Agness Kennedy NC Marriage Index 1741-2004
    Fleming, Mitchel to Agness Kennedy NC Marriage Records 1741-2004
    Fleming, Mitchel to Agness Kennedy NC Marriage Records 1741-2004
    Children 
    +1. Fleming, Jane,   b. 11 Jan 1786, Mecklenburg County,,North Carolina,USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Apr 1865, ,Cape Girardeau County,Missouri,USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years)
     2. Fleming, William,   b. Abt 1787, Mecklenburg County,,North Carolina,USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. ,,North Carolina,USA Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. Fleming, Richard,   b. Abt 1789, Mecklenburg County,,North Carolina,USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. ,,North Carolina,USA Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. Fleming, Margaret,   b. 04 Feb 1791, Mecklenburg County,,North Carolina,USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Aug 1822, ,Cape Girardeau County,Missouri,USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 31 years)
     5. Fleming, Mary,   b. 26 Aug 1794, ,Cabarrus County,North Carolina,USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Mar 1864, ,Cape Girardeau County,Missouri,USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years)
     6. Fleming, Agnes,   b. 23 Dec 1795, ,Cabarrus County,North Carolina,USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 May 1865, ,Bond County,Illinois,USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years)
     7. Fleming, Elizabeth,   b. Abt 1800, ,Cabarrus County,North Carolina,USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. ,,Texas,USA Find all individuals with events at this location
     8. Fleming, Sarah,   b. 18 Jan 1802, ,Cabarrus County,North Carolina,USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Sep 1879, ,Cape Girardeau County,Missouri,USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years)
    +9. Fleming, Hiram,   b. 17 Aug 1804, ,Cabarrus County,North Carolina,USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Mar 1843, Jackson,Cape Girardeau County,Missouri,USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 38 years)
    Last Modified 3 Sep 2016 
    Family ID F90811952  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Stevenson, Jane,   b. 02 Jun 1776, ,Cabarrus County,North Carolina,USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 02 May 1837, ,Cape Girardeau County,Missouri,USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 60 years) 
    Married 14 Jan 1824  ,Cabarrus County,North Carolina,USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Groom: Mitchel Fleming
      Bride: Jane Stevenson
      Bond_Date: 14 Jan 1824
      Bond #: 000007993
      Level Info: North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1741-1868
      ImageNum: 007644
      County: Cabarrus
      Record #: 01 071
      Bondsman: M. Hunt
    Fleming - Various - Cabarrus County Marriage Bonds 42091_327454-00075
    Fleming - Various - Cabarrus County Marriage Bonds 42091_327454-00075
    Notes 
    • Mitchell Fleming honored; soldier in Revolutionary War…
      By Tom Nuemeyer
      Mrs. Gale Seabaugh’s great, great, great, great, grandfather, Mitchell Flaming, came briefly into the limelight last Friday as his final resting place was marked by the Daughters of the American Revolution with a bronze plaque honoring him as a soldier in the Revolutionary War. Because few of its veterans came this far west, such a plaque is relatively unique in this area.
      The grave is near New Wells on the old Fleming farm, which is now owned by Marvin Richter. Mrs. Seabaugh, who is Secretary at the Presbyterian Church 1n Jackson, provided the information on her ancestor for this article, with a assistance from her grandfather, H. R. Stevenson of Fruitland.
      Mitchell Fleming was born in April, 1761, in Kent County, Del. In a few years, the Fleming family pulled up stakes and moved south to Rowan County, N.C. near the Coddle Creek. He grew up fast in the wilderness that was short on comforts and long on hardships.
      In 1777 he enlisted in Captain Craig’s Company, of Col. Francis Locke's Regiment at the age of 16. The Company was involved in one skirmish at Coney Island on the Savannah River. In 1782 Fleming became a private in Captain James Stevenson's Company of Col. Isaac's North Carolina Regiment. The pay receipts from the period of his service are listed in North Carolina records.
      With the war’s finale, he married Miss Agnes Kennedy June 27, 1784, in Rowan County N.C. The new family established a farm in Meckinburg (now Cabarrus) County with land he inherited from his father, George Fleming.
      In 1819 the family joined a group of colonists and left North Carolina by wagon train to arrive in Cape Girardeau County. After arriving, Fleming bought some land in Shawnee and Apple Creek Townships at $1.25 an acre. Land patients were issued for his purchases in 1821 and 1823. The land was scoured mostly in 80 acre plots for a total of 840 acres. Practically all of it was located among various creek bottoms.
      As each of his daughters married, he deeded his new son-in-law an eighty acre tract, which later was willed to the daughter.
      On September 21, 1821, Fleming's wife died. Agnes was born in Chester Co., Pennsylvania July 20, 1760, and bore all of Fleming's children.
      In 1824 he took a second wife, Miss Jane Stevenson, who was a sister to his son‑in‑law, James Stevenson. Jane and James were children of Fleming's commander, Capt. James Stevenson. James married Fleming's eldest daughter, Jane. Besides some confusion in names this caused some confusion in relationships. Jane Stevenson Fleming’s brother, James became her son-in-law after her marriage.
      Mitchell Fleming began receiving a pension for his tour of duty in the war in 1832 when Congress passed a general pension act. His application was executed December 22, 1832 in Cape Girardeau County.
      The Mitchell Fleming family was charter members of Apple Creek Presbyterian Church. He had the position of first ruling elder till a year before his death. Fleming must have been a deeply religious man, for when finds were being raised to pay for the new church, be pledged his entire pension from the war until the building was paid for.
      Mitchell Fleming passed away April 18, 1837, at the age of 76, after leading quite a full life. His wife, Jane, followed him in death four days later. The Fleming family plot contains the graves of Mitchell Fleming, his two wives, his daughter Margaret, and a son, Hiram, and his two wives and a daughter. The plot was situated on a hill in the Fleming farm that now belongs to Marvin Richter. Fleming's tombstone is decorated with thirteen stars around the base of the ball on the top. Fleming's nine children, all by his first wife, Agnes, were as follows:
      Jane She was born January 11, 1786, married James Stevenson in N. C., and died April 16, 1865, and was buried in Apple Creek Cemetery.
      William married Ginny Woodside in N. C. in 1808 and remained in that state.
      Richard married Jean Waddington in N. C. in 1814 and also remained there.
      Margaret was born February 17, 1791, died August 15, 1822, having not married, and was buried in the family cemetery.
      Mary was born August 26, 1794, married Benjamin Brown in 1824, died March 20, 1864, and was buried in the Apple Creek Cemetery.
      Agnes was born December 23, 1795, married Robert S. McFarland December 20, 1821, went to Bond County, Ill. in 1837, died May 12,1865 and was buried in Bethel Cemetery, Bond County.
      Elizabeth married James B. Little in 1824 and it is thought they moved to Texas.
      Sarah was born January 18, 1802, married Zenas N. Ross, died September 27, 1879, and was buried in the Apple Creek Cemetery.
      Hiram was born August 17, 1804, was a merchant who had one of the first stores is Jackson, married to Jane Stevenson, January 1837, who died that December, and then married Margaret Stevenson by whom he had one daughter, Martha Jane, born in 1842 and died 1846. The whole family is buried in the Fleming Cemetery.

      -- From the Jackson Post & Cash - Book, June 26, 1974, Jackson, Missouri
    • Mitchell Fleming Request for Pension as a soldier in the Revolutionary War

      Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

      Pension application of Mitchel Fleming S16810 fn14NC

      Transcribed by Will Graves 12/28/08

      [Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

      State of Missouri County of Cape Girardeau

      A declaration in order to obtain the benefits of the act of Congress of 7th June 1832. On the 22nd day of December in the year of our Lord 1832 personally appeared before the Justices of the County Court of the County of Cape Girardeau aforesaid, in Open Court, Mitchel Fleming, a resident of Apple Creek Township in the County of Cape Girardeau and State of Missouri aforesaid aged 71 years and eight months Who first being duly sworn according to law; Doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832; That he volunteered in the year 1777 in the County of Rowan in the State of North Carolina, in Order to supply a draft to be made for the term of five months; that he was first mustered into the Company of Captain Craig at the cross roads near Charlotte North Carolina; the Colonel who commanded the Regiment into which he was mustered was Colonel Frank Lock [sic, Francis Locke]; and the General who commanded the brigade, with the troops in that Section, was General Rutherford; that from the cross roads above mentioned, he marched with the troops to the ten mile spring (so-called) ten miles North of Charleston South Carolina, that he laid there with the troops, two or three weeks, and from thence marched with the troops to a place called Purrysburg 20 miles above Savannah, on Savannah River, near the line between South Carolina and Georgia; at the place last mentioned he with the troops above mentioned joined the regular Army under the command of General Lincoln. That he continued under the command of the officers above mentioned reconnoitering up and down the Savannah River; the American Army generally on the East side of said River and the British Army on the West; that he was in a small engagement on the Savannah River, while defending a landing or preventing the British troops, from crossing the River at a place called the Cany Island [? Long Island?], that he remained with the troops at the place above mentioned until the five months expired and was then properly discharged.

      And further, he states that in the year 1782 he was drafted or classed in the County of Rowan in the State of North Carolina aforesaid and was mustered into a company of horse under the command of Captain James Stevenson, that, he marched with the company above mentioned, in a Regiment of horse and foot under the command of Colonel Isaacs, to meet the British at Wilmington North Carolina, but before reaching Wilmington was ordered to stop on Deep River about 50 miles above Fayetteville, having been informed that the British had evacuated Wilmington, that the horse company to which he was attached was employed in reconnoitering the Country about Deep River, suppressing the Tories, disaffected &c; that he served with the troops above mentioned two months during which time they took about 20 Tories were disaffected persons and conveyed them to Salisbury Rowan County North Carolina where he received a written discharge: That not then or since believing that the discharges he received as aforesaid, would be of any service to him, they have been both lost from his possession, and cannot now be found.

      That the said Mitchel removed from North Carolina to Cape Girardeau County Missouri, in the year 1819 where he has resided ever since; that he has no documentary testimony and this Country by which he can establish the facts above related.

      The said Mitchel hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present; and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State.

      And to the Interrogatories prescribed by the War department & put by the Court, the said Mitchel Fleming answers and says as follows:

      1st. I was born in Kent County in the State of Delaware in the year 1761;
      2nd. I have my age recorded in my family Bible at my house about 12 miles from this place (Jackson);
      3rd. I [ ] entered by James Nixon a school master taken from the family record of my father;
      4. I belonged to the militia, and there was a draft to be made and I volunteered on the first call and on the Second of militia were classed and the class to which I belonged were called out; the first being for five months and the second for two months, both of which terms I served;
      5. I was acquainted with General Lincoln Commander of the regular troops at Purrysburg on the first company and with Colonel Isaacs commandant of the militia from Wilkes County and Colonel Paceley [sic, Paisley] of Guilford County; also commandant of the militia during the last Campaign, and with Captain James Stevenson of the militia; We having not reached the regular Army until the British Army had evacuated Wilmington as aforesaid; the first tour I served in the company of Captain Craig, the second Captain Stevenson; I knew, while on my first tour, Colonel Locke and Lieutenant Colonel Brevard of the militia and their Regiment the only one I knew or served in on the first campaign;
      6. After serving the first tour of five months I was discharged by Captain Craig, before mentioned, after serving, the second tour of two months under Captain Stevenson, I was discharged by Captain Stevenson at Salisbury, both of which discharges have been lost, I did not consider they would be of any service and after a long time they were mislaid or destroyed;
      7. I am known by Colonel Samuel B. McKnight and Andrew Martin Esquire two of the Justices of the County court; with General Johnson Ranney, with Honorable Alexander Buckner Senator in Congress; Franklin Cannon Esquire Senator from this County, Peter R. Garrett Clerk of the County Court, and with the Reverend Thomas P. Green all of whom reside near me, who can testify as to my character for veracity and their belief of my services as a soldier of the revolution among whom I have lived for 12 years, and I believe all can testify to my character for veracity.

      Sworn and subscribed in Open Court this 22nd day of December A.D. 1832.
      S/ Benjamin Bacon, D. Clerk
      S/ Michael Fleming

      [Oliver Harris, Senior gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

      A.D. 1832 Benjamin Bacon
      D. Clerk of the County Court For Peter R. Garrett, Clerk

      Robert Brevard Senior of legal age being first duly sworn according to law States that he has been acquainted with Mitchel Fleming more or less for some time before the commencement of the revolutionary war, that they were boys together, and the same neighborhood, at that time Rowan County State of North Carolina; that they both belong to one company in that County; That it was a custom at that time of the war breaking out with Great Britain for the soldiers of the company, when a call was made, to Volunteer, that he has knowledge of said Mitchel Fleming having been out on a tour of duty, but not belonging to the same class in which Mitchel did was never out, at the same time with him: those that some part of the company were sent on an expedition down on the Savannah River; has no doubt but said Mitchel Fleming rendered the services in his declaration set forth and mentioned

      Sworn to and subscribed in open court December 22, 1832
      S/ Robert Brevard

      [Thomas P. Green, a clergyman, and Samuel B. McKnight gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

      [facts in file: veteran died April 15, 1837]
    • Will

      Cape County Archives
      Wills and Letters B (#106) 1837 pages B188-189

      State of Missouri
      April 16th, 1836
      County of Cape Girardeau

      In the name of God Amen. I, Mitchell Fleming of the County and State aforesaid being in perfect health and sound in mind and memory. Through the blessing of God and the circumstances calling to recollection the mortality of my body do hereby ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following
      (viz) I ordain it and it is my will that my body be decently buried in the earth and in great submission, I submit my soul to God who gave it and as touching such worldly property as it has pleased God to bless me with I dispose of it in manner following
      1st I will that all my just debts be paid together with funeral expenses.
      2nd I give and bequeath to my beloved wife Jane Fleming her dower and one third of the plantation I now live on, during her widowhood, also one black calf named Coby, two milk cows and one half of my kitchen furniture, and all the household furniture she had when I married her, the half she has made since I married her, together with her saddle and bridle.
      3rd, I bequeath to my daughter Polly Brown eighty acres of land lying and being in range thirteen and Township thirty three N Section twenty eight the East half of the Southwest quarter to her and her heirs forever—
      4th, I give and bequeath to my daughter Agnes McFarland eighty acres of land lying and being in Range Thirteen East Township thirty three No. Section eight west half of the Southeast quarter (the tract of land Robert McFarland now occupies) to her and her heirs forever—
      5th, I give to my daughter Elizabeth Little eighty acres of land lying and being in range thirteen East township thirty three section thirty East half of the Southeast quarter to her and her heirs forever—
      6th I give and bequeath to my daughter Sada Ross forty acres of land lying and being in range thirteen E. Township thirty three (North) N, west part of the Southeast quarter (north end of the eighty acre lot) with the sum of twenty five dollars to her and her heirs forever—
      7th I give and bequeath to my son Hiram Fleming one hundred and sixty acres of land lying and being in range thirteen E. Township thirty three N., Section twenty on northwest quarter to him and his heirs forever. I also give and bequeath to Hiram aforesaid a bay horse named Paddy with one cow two plows two pairs of farming giers, one bed and furniture and half of all my kitchen furniture.
      8th It is my will that all my books be equally divided between my children and wife.
      9th It is my will that all my land and tenements not heretofore specified together with all my goods and chattel be sold and equally divided between my four daughters (viz) Polly Brown, Agnes McFarland, Elizabeth Little and Sada Ross and also my son Hiram—
      10th It is my will that my executors pay ten dollars each to my four grandchildren (viz) Mitchell Fleming Stevenson, Mitchell John Brown, Mitchell John Little, and Mitchell James Fleming.
      11th It is my will that each legatee receive their several amounts coming to them by sale of my property that may be sold in notes to their several amounts from the hands of the executors.
      12th I do hereby constitute my son Hiram Fleming and Benjamin Brown my executors to execute this my last will and testament hereby revoking, disannulling and making void all former wills and testaments by me made. In testimony where of I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this day and date aforesaid.
      Mitchell Fleming
      (seal)

      teste:
      Zenas N. Ross
      James Stevenson
      Samuel B. McKnight
    • Mitchell Fleming research by Alenia McCord

      He was born in April 1761 in Kent County Delaware, but very early in life moved to Rowan County, N.C. near the Coddle Creek church, with his parents. There he enlisted in Captain Craig's Company in 1777, age 16 years (Colonel Francis Lock's North Carolina Regiment) and was in an engagement at Caney Island on the Savannah River. He enlisted in 1782 and served as a private in Capt. James Stevenson's Company, Colonel Isaac's North Carolina Regiment. Later his eldest daughter married Capt. Stevenson's son James. (Pay receipts are listed in North Carolina records).
      He married Agnes Kennedy 27 Jan 1784, in Rowan County, N.C. They lived from that time until 1819 in Mecklenberg County (became Cabarrus about 1786) on the land he inherited from his father, George Fleming. In 1819 he went by wagon train with a large colony from the area of the Coddle Creek Church to Cape County, MO. There he purchased a section of land in Shawnee and Apple Creek townships for which he paid $1.25 an acre. He received patents for all this in 1821 and 1823. Agness Kennedy Fleming died in 1821, and in 1824 he married Jane Stevenson, who was a maiden sister of his son-in-law, James Stevenson. The marriage is recorded both in Perry County, MO and in Cabarrus County, N.C.
      One thing about his land purchases: he came to Cape County very early, so he did not take his sections in one piece. He took it in eighty acre parts, and practically the entire 640 acres was in various creek bottoms, the best land at that time. As each daughter married he deeded his son-in-law and eighty acre tract, which was later willed to the daughter.
      In 1832, when Congress passed a general pension law he received a pension for his Revolutionary War service on his application executed 22 Dec 1832 in Cape Girardeau County, MO.

      Mitchell Fleming was a charter member, along with his entire family, of the Apple Creek Presbyterian Church and was the first ruling elder of the church, remaining in that position until the year before his death. He seemed to always been the heaviest contributor to the church. One time, when they were raising money to pay for their new building, he pledged his entire pension from the Revolution until the building was paid for.
      Mitchell Fleming, two wives, daughter Margaret, son Hiram, his two wives and daughter are buried on a hill on his farm, now belonging to Marvin Richter, in Shawneetown Township, Cape Girardeau County, MO. On his tombstone, around the ball at the top are thirteen stars.

      Mitchell Fleming - born 22 April 1761, died 18 April 1837.

      Agnes Kennedy (1st wife, mother of children) - born 20 July 1760 in Chester County, PA, died 21 Sept 1821.

      Jane Stevenson (2nd wife) - born 1776, died 2 May 1837,

      Children:
      1. Jane - born 11 Jan 1786. Married James Stevenson in NC.
      died 16 April 1865, buried in Apple Creek Cemetery.
      2. William - married Ginny Woodside in NC 1808, remained in NC.
      3. Richard - Married Jean Wadington, 1814 in NC, remained in NC.
      4. Margaret - Born 17 Feb 1791, died 15 August 1822, unmarried.
      5. Mary - Born 26 Aug 1794. Married Benjamin Brown in 1824. Died 20 March 1864, Buried Apple Creek Cemetery.
      6. Agnes - Born 23 Dec 1795. Married Robert S. McFarland
      20 Dec 1821. Died 12 May 1865. Came to Bond County IL in 1837. Buried Bethel Cemetery.
      7. Elizabeth - Born ? Married James B. Little, 1824. It is thought they moved to Texas.
      8. Sarah - Born 18 Jan 1802, died 27 Sept 1879. Married Zenas N. Ross.
      9. Hiram - Born 17 Aug 1804, died 22 Mar 1843. He was a merchant, had one of the first stores in Jackson. Married Jane Stevenson, born 1814, died 23 Dec 1837 (dau of John Stevenson) 10 Jan 1837. Married second Margaret ______ did not find a marriage record. All buried in the Fleming Cemetery.

      -by Miss Alenia McCord
      1716 West Jackson St.
      Vandalia, IL 62471
      24 Feb 1974
    Last Modified 3 Sep 2016 
    Family ID F55051642  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 22 Apr 1761 - Kent County,,Delaware,USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 27 Jan 1784 - ,Rowan County,North Carolina,USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 14 Jan 1824 - ,Cabarrus County,North Carolina,USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 18 Apr 1837 - ,Cape Girardeau County,Missouri,USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Fleming Cemetery,Cape Girardeau County,Missouri,USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    Fleming Cemetery Ceremony
    Fleming Cemetery Ceremony
    Fleming-Cemetery-Map-copyright
    Fleming-Cemetery-Map-copyright
    Bethpage Presbyterian early history - Concord Tribune 1948
    Bethpage Presbyterian early history - Concord Tribune 1948
    Mitchel Fleming is one of the orignal trustess May 19, 1795.

    Mitchel Fleming is a fist elder in 1816.

    R. W. Fleming is an elder in 1894.
    Mitchell Fleming Land Grant
    Mitchell Fleming Land Grant
    Fleming_FamiliesCabarrusCntyNC-0058(1)
    Fleming_FamiliesCabarrusCntyNC-0058(1)
    Fleming cemetary location
    Fleming cemetary location
    Fleming graveyard layout
    Fleming graveyard layout
    8/3/2014
    8/3/2014
    8/3/2014
    8/3/2014
    Mitchel Fleming gravestone
    Mitchel Fleming gravestone
    Mitchell Fleming Application for pension
    Mitchell Fleming Application for pension
    Mitchel Fleming Rev War Records
    Mitchel Fleming Rev War Records